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What An Electromagnetic Field Surrounding You Sounds Like

Posted: July 30th, 2014, 9:51 am
by MikeQuell

Re: What An Electromagnetic Field Surrounding You Sounds Lik

Posted: August 1st, 2014, 9:45 am
by DanCostello
oh, sick. Might have to buy one of those...

-Dan.

Re: What An Electromagnetic Field Surrounding You Sounds Lik

Posted: August 18th, 2014, 1:50 am
by GrahamDonnelly
I recorded a library of radio sounds for a company once - but used a pickup coil microphone. This thing looks a lot more sensitive and versatile. Will be keeping an eye on the product for sure, as these radio static sounds are very useful. Thanks for letting us know of its existence.

Re: What An Electromagnetic Field Surrounding You Sounds Lik

Posted: August 23rd, 2014, 5:33 am
by AndreEngelhardt
After realizing that the next batch(es) are already sold out on this device I had a look if I had some of the components and what I had lying around (and guess what, we probably all do!).

All you need is an inductor (can find those frequently in old modems, dsl routers, dsl splitters etc.) and solder it up to ground and signal on any audio cable, plug it into a mobile recorder (I used the 3.5mm mic input on a Sony PCM M-10) turn up the gain and record away. As an example of what kind of inductor to use (they're about 50 cents to a buck) this is a good one:

http://www.mouser.de/ProductDetail/Fast ... %2f9P2s%3d

This is what it looks like:
IMG_2747.JPG
Inductor hooked up to audio cable
The one I used is a bit different in that it doesn't give as much output and thus a worse SNR but I've ordered a bunch of different inductors (such as the one above which seems to be ideal) to experiment.

I don't see any advantage of having two inductors hooked up as a pseudo stereo device since basically all you have to do to get the same effect is copy the track and phase shift it slightly ... but again, I'll experiment and see what happens and share here.

What's amazing is pitching the recordings down since there is a ton of material up in the >20kHz range all the way up to 48kHz ... this is where a 192kHz recorder might come in really handy.

I'll spare you the sound samples because they're the same as in the video. Fun way to use it is to attach the thing to a camera then flash your hand in front of the camera to modulate the signal in real time. Oh the possibilities ... ;)